Friday, 14 May 2021 00:00

Strong and flexible feet are essential to runners. Feet are the part of the body that strike and engage with the ground, and provide the foundation on which the body relies to complete and sustain the running movement. With 26 bones in each foot, nearly one quarter of all the bones in our bodies are located in the feet, not to mention muscles and tendons. Strong arches are an important component in the propulsion action the feet and legs perform during running and also help the foot’s ability to adequately absorb high-impact forces which is critical to preventing injuries. Sometimes, runners either need to compensate for flat feet, or they can develop fallen arches over time. There are exercises a podiatrist can suggest to help you strengthen your foot muscles, as well as custom orthotics to give you the proper arch support you need while running. Additionally, they may present a surgical option to correct flexible flatfoot.

Flatfoot is a condition many people suffer from. If you have flat feet, contact one of our clinicians from The Footcare Centre. Our podiatrists will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Are Flat Feet?

Flatfoot is a condition in which the arch of the foot is depressed and the sole of the foot is almost completely in contact with the ground. About 20-30% of the population generally has flat feet because their arches never formed during growth.

Conditions & Problems:

Having flat feet makes it difficult to run or walk because of the stress placed on the ankles.

Alignment – The general alignment of your legs can be disrupted, because the ankles move inward which can cause major discomfort.

Knees – If you have complications with your knees, flat feet can be a contributor to arthritis in that area.  

Symptoms

  • Pain around the heel or arch area
  • Trouble standing on the tip toe
  • Swelling around the inside of the ankle
  • Flat look to one or both feet
  • Having your shoes feel uneven when worn

Treatment

If you are experiencing pain and stress on the foot you may weaken the posterior tibial tendon, which runs around the inside of the ankle. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Weybridge, UK . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Flat Feet
Wednesday, 12 May 2021 00:00

Having an abnormal foot structure, like flat feet or high arches, may be a contributing factor in the development of the condition known as plantar fasciitis. Additionally, this ailment may develop from standing on hard surfaces for most of the day, or from wearing shoes that do not fit correctly. The plantar fascia is a band of tissue that is located on the sole of the foot and connects the heel to the toes. This ailment is defined as an inflamed plantar fascia and can cause severe pain and discomfort. Research has shown that patients who are obese may also develop plantar fasciitis, and this may be a result of the added weight the feet must endure. A typical symptom that is associated with this condition can consist of severe heel and arch pain, and it may be more prevalent in the morning upon rising. Some patients have found mild relief when specific stretches are frequently performed, as this may help to heal the injured plantar fascia. If you have heel pain, it is strongly suggested that you speak with a podiatrist who can guide you toward treatment options that are correct for you.

Plantar fasciitis can be very painful and inconvenient. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact one of our clinicians  from The Footcare Centre. Our podiatrists can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is the inflammation of the thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of your foot, known as the plantar fascia, and causes mild to severe heel pain.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Non-supportive shoes
  • Overpronation
  • Repeated stretching and tearing of the plantar fascia

How Can It Be Treated?

  • Conservative measures – anti-inflammatories, ice packs, stretching exercises, physical therapy, orthotic devices
  • Shockwave therapy – sound waves are sent to the affected area to facilitate healing and are usually used for chronic cases of plantar fasciitis
  • Surgery – usually only used as a last resort when all else fails. The plantar fascia can be surgically detached from the heel

While very treatable, plantar fasciitis is definitely not something that should be ignored. Especially in severe cases, speaking to your podiatrist right away is highly recommended to avoid complications and severe heel pain. Your podiatrist can work with you to provide the appropriate treatment options tailored to your condition.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Weybridge, UK . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Plantar Fasciitis

Thursday, 29 April 2021 00:00

Don't hide your feet when the weather gets warm. Get treated for fungal nails, and wear sandals and open-toed shoes with confidence. Step into spring with confidence!

Monday, 19 April 2021 00:00

Stress fractures occur over time, with a moderate amount of pressure being applied to a bone which eventually can cause it to break without dislocating it—as is often the case with a sudden traumatic bone fracture. Because the feet and ankles bear the weight of our bodies every day, stress fractures in these areas are not unusual. The repetitive movements of everyday activities such as running, standing and walking apply steady force which can weaken the bone. This causes a stress reaction which may lead to the bone eventually breaking. Stress fractures typically occur in either athletes who can wear out their feet and ankles through overuse, and people with insufficient density in their bones due to conditions such as osteoporosis. However, having a bunion which can shift weight distribution, wearing high heels, starting a new high impact activity, or increasing the intensity and frequency of workouts suddenly can also increase the likelihood of a stress fracture. If you are experiencing any weakness or fatigue in your ankles, it is suggested that you contact a podiatrist who can help you maintain optimal foot and ankle health.

Activities where too much pressure is put on the feet can cause stress fractures. To learn more, contact one of our clinicians from The Footcare Centre. Our podiatrists can provide the care you need to keep your pain free and on your feet.

Dealing with Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle

Stress fractures occur in the foot and ankle when muscles in these areas weaken from too much or too little use.  The feet and ankles then lose support when walking or running from the impact of the ground. Since there is no protection, the bones receive the full impact of each step. Stress on the feet can cause cracks to form in the bones, thus creating stress fractures.

What Are Stress Fractures?

Stress fractures occur frequently in individuals whose daily activities cause great impact on the feet and ankles. Stress factors are most common among:

  • Runners                                  
  • People affected with Osteoporosis
  • Tennis or basketball players
  • Gymnasts
  • High impact workouts

Symptoms

Pain from the fractures occur in the area of the fractures and can be constant or intermittent. It will often cause sharp or dull pain with swelling and tenderness. Engaging in any kind of activity which involves high impact will aggravate pain.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Weybridge, UK . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Dealing with Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle

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